Many Native Americans do not live near a facility offering SANE or SART services. Research shows gaps in sexual assault services and coverages for more than two-thirds of Native American lands, and some communities have no coverage at all.

Program Overview

T-SASP

Tribal SASP Program

The Tribal Sexual Assault Services Program (T–SASP) was created by VAWA 2005, and is the first federal funding stream dedicated solely to developing culturally relevant services that are specifically responsive
to sexual assault victims within tribal communities. Because tribes reflect great diversity of history, geographic location, language, socioeconomic conditions, and retention of traditional spiritual and cultural practices, the T–SASP tribal grantees are strongly encouraged to incorporate cultural and traditional practices (e.g. talking circles, healing ceremonies, and sweat lodges) for those who have been sexually victimized.

The primary purpose of Tribal SASP is to establish, maintain, and expand culturally specific intervention and related assistance for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) victims of sexual assault. Grantees are Indian tribes, tribal government organizations, and nonprofit tribal organizations. They provide intervention, advocacy, accompaniment (e.g. accompanying victims to court, medical facilities, and police departments), support services, and related assistance for adult, youth, and child victims of sexual assault; non-offending family and household members of victims; and those collaterally affected by sexual assault.

Trainings

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Tribal SASP Training Video

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News & Updates

January 11, 2018

VAWA MEI’s newest resource for grantees

VAWA MEI has compiled grantees’ most frequently asked questions to help you get quick answers.

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