Tools & Resources Abuse in Later Life Program Abuse in Later Life Reporting Form Instructions

Abuse in Later Life Reporting Form Instructions

View program-specific reporting form instructions for more in-depth guidance on how to report grant-funded activities on the progress report.

OVW grant recipients are statutorily required to report on grant-funded activities every six months. Data reported on semi-annual progress reports help OVW monitor funded projects and illustrate grant program accomplishments. Instructions give detailed information and examples to help grantees understand what information to report in each question on the progress reporting form.

Scroll down to view the instructions, or click on the VIEW INSTRUCTIONS button above to view, download or print the PDF file.

Progress reports are due 30 days after the close of each reporting period:

  • January – June reports are due July 30
  • July – December reports are due January 30.

U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women
Instructions for Semi-Annual Progress Report for enhanced Training and Services to End Violence and Abuse of Women Later in Life Program

Section Links

Use the links below to skip to particular sections of the instructions.


Introduction

The Violence Against Women Act of 2000 (VAWA 2000) requires grantees to report on the effectiveness of activities carried out with grant funds, including the number of persons served and number of persons seeking services who could not be served.  To meet this Congressional reporting requirement and the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act, the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) requires all grantees to complete this Semi-Annual Progress Report.

A grant administrator or coordinator must ensure that the form is completed fully with regard to all grant activities.  Grant administrators and coordinators are responsible for compiling and submitting a single report that reflects all information collected from grant partners.  Grant partners, however, may complete sections relevant to their portion of the grant.

This form is to be used for reporting progress semi-annually for the periods January 1 to June 30 and July 1 to December 31.   All grantees should read each section to determine which questions they must answer based on the activities engaged in under this grant during the current reporting period. Sections B and E of this form must be completed by all grantees.  In section A, subsection A1 must be completed by all grantees. In section C, subsection C2 must be completed by all grantees.  In section D and subsections A2, C1, C3 and C4, grantees must answer an initial question about whether they engaged in certain activities during the current reporting period.  If the response is yes, then the grantee must complete that section or subsection.  If the response is no, the rest of that section or subsection is skipped.

The activities of volunteers or interns may be reported if they are coordinated or supervised by Elder Grants Program-funded staff or if Elder Grants Program funds substantially support their activities.

This form must be submitted to OVW within 30 days from the end of the current reporting period (i.e., by July 30 or January 30).  OVW recognizes that some of the information requested in this form will not be available for many projects until they have had sufficient time to implement record-keeping procedures to track the information requested.  In the meantime, provide the most accurate and complete information possible with the data you have available.

If you have any questions about this form or if you need assistance completing the form, call the VAWA Measuring Effectiveness Initiative at the Muskie School of Public Service, 1-800-922-VAWA (8292).  Frequently asked questions and other information on the Semi-Annual Progress Report can be found on this website.  If you have questions about your grant, please contact your OVW program specialist at 1-202-307-6026 (TTY: 202-307-2277).

INSTRUCTIONS

Please note: It may be helpful to have the Enhanced Training and Services to End Violence and Abuse of Women Later in Life Program (Elder Grants Program) Application Guideline and your grant proposal(s) available at the time you complete this form.  The application guideline is available on the OVW website.

A.    General Information

A1.  Grant Information

All grantees must complete this subsection.

1.     Date of report

Enter the date on which you complete this form.

2.  Current reporting period

This information will be pre-populated by the GMS system. You must download a new reporting form for each reporting period.

3.  Grantee name

This information will be pre-populated by the GMS system.

4.     Grant number

This information will be pre-populated by the GMS system.

5., 5a. Type of funded organization

Choose the box that best describes the type of agency/organization receiving the Elder Grants Program grant.

In question 5a, indicate whether the grantee is a faith-based organization.

6.   Point of contact

Provide the name, agency/organization name if different from grantee, mailing address, telephone number, facsimile number, and e-mail address for the person responsible for the day-to-day coordination or administration of the grant

7.   Tribal populations

Check yes if your grant specifically focuses on American Indians and indicate which tribes or nations you serve or intend to serve.

Indian tribe: A tribe, band, pueblo, nation, or other organized group or community of Indians, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation (as defined in, or established pursuant to, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act [43 U.S.C. §1601 et seq.]) that is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians.

8.  Percentage of Elder Grants Program funds directed to each of these areas

Provide appropriate percentages to reflect the time and/or resources you have devoted to each of these areas during the current reporting period.  The total of all percentages should be 100%.

Please note:  The category elder abuse, neglect, and/or exploitation, applies only to abuse by non-intimate partners and non-family members that is not already included under the other categories.

Sexual assault is a continuum of behaviors defined in VAWA to include both sexual assaults committed by offenders who are strangers to the victim and sexual assaults committed by offenders who are known to, related by blood or marriage to, or in a dating relationship with the victim.  VAWA defines sexual assault as any conduct proscribed as sexual abuse by federal statute.  Such proscribed behavior includes knowingly causing another person to engage in a sexual act by using force against that other person or by threatening or placing that other person in fear.  It also includes engaging in a sexual act with another person after knowingly rendering that person unconscious, or administering to another person by force or threat of force, or without the knowledge or permission of that person, a drug, intoxicant, or other similar substance and thereby substantially impairing the ability of that other person to appraise or control sexual conduct.  Sexual assault also includes knowingly engaging in a sexual act with another person if that other person is incapable of appraising the nature of the conduct or is physically incapable of declining participation in or communicating unwillingness to engage in that sexual act.  Sexual assault also includes knowingly engaging in sexual contact with another person without the other person’s permission.  Finally, the statute proscribes any attempts to commit any of these acts.

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) defines domestic violence to include felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence (including threats or attempts) committed by a current or former spouse of the victim/survivor, by a person with whom the victim/survivor shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabiting with or has cohabited with the victim/survivor as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim/survivor under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim/survivor who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies.  It should be understood that domestic violence applies to any pattern of coercive behavior that is used by one person to gain power and control over a current or former intimate partner.  This pattern of behavior may include physical or sexual violence, emotional and psychological intimidation, threats, verbal abuse, dating violence, stalking, isolation, and economic control. In compiling domestic violence figures, grantee should include grant funds directed at dating violence.  The Violence Against Women Act defines dating violence as violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.  The existence of such a relationship is determined by the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Stalking is defined as a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress

Elder abuse is defined in the Older Americans Act of 1965 as the willful infliction of injury, unreasonable confinement, intimidation, or cruel punishment with resulting physical harm, pain, or mental anguish; or deprivation by a person, including a caregiver, of goods or services that are necessary to avoid physical harm, mental anguish, or mental illness of an older individual (i.e., an individual who is 60 years of age or older).  Exploitation is defined as the illegal or improper act or process of an individual, including a caregiver, using the resources of an older individual for monetary or personal benefit, profit or gain. Neglect is the failure of a caregiver to provide the goods or services that are necessary to avoid physical harm, mental anguish, or mental illness.

EXAMPLE: Your project trains law enforcement on recognizing abuse and sexual assault against individuals who are older, and you train equally on sexual abuse, domestic violence/dating violence, stalking, and elder abuse, neglect and/or exploitation.  You would report that 25% of your grant money goes to sexual assault, 25% to domestic violence, 25% to stalking, and 25% to elder abuse, neglect, and/or exploitation.

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A2. Staff Information

If your Elder Grants Program funds were used to fund staff positions during the current reporting period, check yes and answer question 9.  If not, check no and skip to section B.

9.     Staff

Report the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff funded under this grant during the current reporting period.  Include employees who are part time and/or partially funded with these grant funds as well as consultants/contractors. Report staff by function(s) performed, not by title or location.  Report all FTEs in decimals, not percentages.  One FTE is equal to 1,040 hours—40 hours per week multiplies by 26 weeks.  If an employee or contractor was employed or utilized for only a portion of the reporting period, prorate appropriately. If staff members fall into two or more categories of job descriptions divide their time appropriately.

EXAMPLE 1:  If a staff member, whose salary is 100% funded with Elder Grants Program funds, spends approximately 20 hours a week training law enforcement officers, and 20 hours providing administrative support, report .50 under trainer and .50 under support staff.

EXAMPLE 2: If an employee worked full-time for the first three months and had no time on the grant during the last three months of the reporting period, report that staff person as .50 FTE.

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B. Purpose Areas

All grantees must complete this section.

10.  Purpose areas

Check all purpose areas that apply to activities engaged in with Elder Grants Program funds during the current reporting period.

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C. Function Areas

C1. Training

If your Elder Grants Program funds were used to provide training during the current reporting period, check yes and answer questions 11-20.  If not, check no and skip to C2.

11. Number of people trained in the mandatory law enforcement training of trainers event

Training, for the purposes of this reporting form means providing information on elder abuse, neglect, exploitation, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and/or stalking, that enables a person to improve her/his response to victims/survivors who are older as it relates to her/his role in the system.

Report the total number of people who attended a mandatory training of trainers event provided during the current reporting period by type of organization

12. Number of training events provided for law enforcement officers and/or detectives/investigators

Report the total number of mandatory and advanced law enforcement training events supported with Elder Grants Program funds provided for law enforcement officers and detectives/investigators during the current reporting period.

13.  Number of people trained in the mandatory and/or advanced law enforcement training events

Report the total number of people who attended mandatory and/or advanced law enforcement training events supported with Elder Grants Program funds.

14. Number of prosecutors trained in the prosecutors workshop

Report the total number of prosecutors who attended a national prosecutors workshop on elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

15. Number of judges trained in the judicial institute

Report the total number of judges who attended a national judicial institute on elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

16. Number of people trained in the mandatory direct services training of trainers event

Report the total number of people who attended a mandatory training of trainers event provided during the current reporting period by type of organization.

17. Number of people trained in the mandatory local direct services training events provided with Elder Grants Program funds

Report the total number of people trained at local direct services training events during the current reporting period by type of organization.

18. Cross-training events

Report the total number of cross-training events provided for victim service organizations, governmental agencies, courts, law enforcement, and nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations working with older victims.

19.  Number of people trained in the cross-training events supported with Elder Grants Program funds

Report the total number of people trained in cross-training events during the current reporting period by type of organization.

20. (Optional) Additional Information

Use this space to discuss the effectiveness of training activities funded or supported by your Elder  Grants Program. You may provide examples, data, or any other information about your training activities that you have not already provided.

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C2. Coordinated Community Response

All grantees must complete this subsection.

21. Coordinated community response activities

Check the appropriate boxes to indicate the agencies or organizations, even if they are not memorandum of understanding (MOU) partners, that you provided onsite consultation to; attended invitational meetings with; engaged in planning, development, implementation of training with; or engaged in partnership, team building, and cross training with during the current reporting period.  In the last column, indicate the agencies or organizations with which you have a MOU for purposes of your Elder Grants Program.

Onsite consultations—meetings that take place at the site of Elder Grants Program partners, criminal justice agencies, and/or advocacy organizations for the purpose of sharing promising practices.

Invitational meetings—meetings organized by Elder Grants Program-funded staff to which law enforcement, prosecution and court staff at the federal, state, tribal, or local level and/or staff of advocacy organizations are invited to come together to debate and discuss complex issues.

Planning, development, implementation of training—training materials, and/or events with which Elder Grants Program-funded staff worked with other agencies to develop, revise, or implement.

Partnership, team building and crosstraining—activities that bring together advocates and criminal justice professionals to build or improve collaborative relationships.  This should include cross-training and train-the-trainer sessions.

22. (Optional) Additional Information

Use this space to discuss the effectiveness of CCR activities funded or supported by your Elder Grant Program grant.  You may provide examples, data, or any other information about your CCR activities.

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C3.  Policies

If Elder Grants Program funds were used to develop, substantially revise, or implement policies or protocols during the current reporting period, or if Elder Grants Program funds directly supported the development, revision, and/or implementation of policies or protocols, check yes and answer questions 23-24.  If not, check no and skip to C4.

23. Types of protocols and/or policies developed, substantially revised or implemented during the current reporting period

Check the boxes that describe policies or protocols developed, substantially revised and/or implemented with Elder Grants Program funds during the current reporting period. Check all that apply.

Develop:  To create a new policy or protocol.

Substantially revise:  To make a significant amendment to an existing policy or protocol.

Implement:  To carry out a new or revised policy or protocol as standard practice.

EXAMPLE 1:  (Develop) Law enforcement did not have a policy concerning appropriate responses to victims/survivors on procedures for anonymous, confidential, or Jane Doe reporting of sexual assault.  During the current reporting period, Elder Grants Program-funded staff assisted with the development of a policy for responding appropriately to victims/survivors who are older.  You report this activity during the current reporting period because the development of the policy was completed.

EXAMPLE 2:  (Substantially revise) The courts had a policy concerning appropriate response to victims/survivors who are older, but it did not include stalking.  During the current reporting period, Elder Grants Program-funded staff assisted with the amendment of the policy to include appropriate response to older victim/survivors within the context of stalking.  You report this activity during the current reporting period because the amendments were completed and the policy was revised.

EXAMPLE 3: (Implement) Victim services amended their policy concerning appropriate response to underserved victims/survivors who are elderly.  During the current reporting period Elder Grants Program-funded staff provided support for the distribution of the new protocols and the support necessary for the new protocols to become standard practice within the agency.  You would report this activity during the current reporting period because the protocol became standard practice.  You would not continue to report this same activity on future reporting forms.

24.  (Optional) Additional Information

Use this space to discuss the effectiveness of policies you have developed, revised, or implemented that were funded or supported by your Elder Grants Program. You may provide examples, data, or any other information about your policy activities that you have not already provided.

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C4. Products

If Elder Grants Program funds were used to develop, substantially revise, or distribute products during the current reporting period, check yes and answer question 25.  If not, check no and skip to section D.

25. Use of Elder Grants Program funds for product development, substantial revision, or distribution

Report the number of products developed, substantially revised, or distributed with Elder Grants Program funds during the current reporting period.  Report the number of new products/materials developed or substantially revised during the current reporting period; the title/topic and intended audience of each product developed, substantially revised, or distributed; and the number of products used or distributed.  If a product was created in or translated into a language other than English, including Braille, indicate the language.  Report on products that were newly developed during the current reporting period whether or not they were used or distributed, and on products that were previously developed but were used or distributed during the current reporting period.

EXAMPLE 1:  You developed a training curriculum for law enforcement officers regarding the unique barriers encountered by older individuals who are victims of domestic violence.  However, you did not use the curriculum during the current reporting period.

For this example, you would report as follows: In the “Training Materials” row, enter “1” in the “Number developed or revised” column; write “Hidden from View: Older Women Victims of Domestic Violence” in the “Title/topic” column; and write “Law enforcement officers” in the “Intended audience” column.

EXAMPLE 2: You distributed 10 copies of previously developed training material for prosecutors on elderly sexual assault victims/survivors.

For this example, you would report as follows: In the “Training Materials” row, write “Prosecution response to elder victims of sexual assault” in the “Title/topic” column; write “Prosecutors” in the “Intended audience” column; and enter “10” in the “Number used or distributed” column.

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D. Victim Services

If Elder Grants Program staff provided victim services, or if grant funds were used to support victim services during the current reporting period, check yes and answer questions 26-32.  If your Elder Grants Program funds were not used for victim services, check no and skip to section E.

26. Number of victims/survivors served, partially served, and victims/survivors seeking services who were not served

Only provide information in this section that represents victims/survivors served and services provided with Elder Grants Program funds during the current reporting period.

Report the following, to the best of your ability, as an unduplicated count for each category during the current reporting period.  This means that each victim/survivor who was seeking or who received services during the current reporting period should be counted only once in that reporting period.  You can report victims/survivors in each reporting period that they request services.

Victims/survivors are those against whom the sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation was directed.  Some victims/survivors may have experienced more than one type of victimization, such as sexual assault and domestic violence, or domestic violence and stalking.  These victims/survivors should be counted only once under the primary victimization.  (See Example 1 below on primary victimization, and refer to definitions of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation in question 8 of these instructions.)  Do not report secondary victims.

EXAMPLE (unduplicated count): A victim /survivor requested services three different times during the current reporting period; you will report this person only once in question 26.

EXAMPLE (unduplicated count):  A victim/survivor requested counseling at the beginning of the reporting period and then the same victim came back at the end of the reporting period and requested civil legal advocacy.  Although this victim came two times and requested two different services, you will only count that victim once in question 26.  You will count the victim once for each type of service received in question 30A.

A.   Victims/survivors served are those who received the service(s) they requested, if those services were provided under your Elder Grants Program.

B.   Victims/survivors partially served are those who received some of the service(s), but not all of the services they requested, if those services were provided under your Elder Grants Program.

C.  Victims/survivors seeking services who were not served are those who sought services but did not receive the service(s) they were seeking, if those services were provided under your Elder Grants Program.

Note:  If you receive a call or request for service from someone who is NOT a victim/survivor, or if the person is a victim/survivor but is requesting a service you do NOT provide under your Elder Grants Program, that person should NOT BE COUNTED in any category.  If you contact victims/survivors to offer services, and they do not want services or you can not locate them, do not count them in this question.  (See instructions for question 30D, Victim-witness notification/outreach to victims.)

EXAMPLE 1:  (Primary victimization) A victim/survivor comes to your program looking for help with a protection order.  Her estranged intimate partner, who had a history of very controlling behavior with some physical abuse, came to her apartment and sexually assaulted her.  You could report her under either domestic violence/dating violence or sexual assault, but you must choose only one.  In this instance, sexual assault may be more appropriate, because it was the sexual assault that prompted her to seek services.

EXAMPLE 2: (Served) A domestic violence victim/survivor calls your program looking for assistance obtaining a protection order.  You assist her with the paperwork and with the filing and service of the emergency protection order, and accompany her to the protection order hearing three weeks later.  Since this victim/survivor received the services she requested that were provided under your Elder Grants Program, she should be counted as “served” in the domestic violence/dating violence column.

EXAMPLE 3: (Partially served) A victim/survivor whose ex-husband has been charged with stalking comes into the prosecutor’s office to get information about the criminal process.  Your advocate explains the process to her, what she can expect, the different hearings that will take place, etc.  She asks the advocate to attend the arraignment with her, but the advocate already is scheduled to be in another courtroom on the date.  This victim/survivor received information from your advocate, but not the other service she requested that you normally provide under your Elder Grants Program.  She should be counted as “partially served” in the stalking column.

EXAMPLE 4:  (Not served) A woman is sexually assaulted by the person with whom she was living.  A police officer who responded to the call has called your program’s hotline on behalf of the victim asking if an advocate will accompany the victim to the hospital during her examination.  There is no advocate available to do this, and it is a service your program is funded to do under your Elder Grants Program.  You are unable to provide the requested service, therefore she should be counted as “not served” in the sexual assault column.

EXAMPLE 5: (Not counted) You receive police reports on all domestic violence incidents responded to by police.  During the reporting period, you sent out letters to 500 victims/survivors based on these police reports, informing victims/survivors of services you provide; twenty-five letters are returned as undeliverable.  Only victims/survivors who contact you after receiving the letter and who request a service that you are funded to provide with Elder Grants Program funds would be counted in question26; none of the other victims/survivors to whom you mailed letters would be counted at all in this question.  (You would, however, count the letters sent to victims/survivors in question30D, if this activity was funded by your Elder Grants Program.) END EXAMPLE.

Examples 6A, 6B, and 6C use the same scenario to illustrate how the three categories of “served,” “partially served,” and “not served” should be applied to the varying responses the victim/survivor received.

EXAMPLE 6

A.  A sexual assault victim/survivor calls your program looking for crisis intervention and group support.  You provide crisis intervention and she attends a support group for sexual assault victims/survivors.  This victim/survivor has received the services she requested that you are funded to provide under your Elder Grants Program and should be counted as “served.”

B.  A sexual assault victim/survivor calls your program looking for crisis intervention and group support.  You provide crisis intervention.  However, your group support services are full and you can not provide this service.  This victim/survivor has received some, but not all, of the services she requested that you are funded to provide under your Elder Grants Program and should be counted as “partially served.”

C.  A sexual assault victim/survivor calls your program looking for crisis intervention and group support.  You have a waiting list for all services and cannot provide her any services at this time.  When your services become available, you cannot locate her.  This victim/survivor has not received any of the services she requested that you are funded to provide under your Elder Grants Program and should be counted as “not served.” END EXAMPLE.

The partially served and not served categories generally have to do with issues within your program that keep you from providing grant-funded services to a victim/survivor who requests those services.  If a victim/survivor chooses to discontinue services once they have begun receiving them, then the victim/survivor should be reported as “served.” The same is true if a victim/survivor moves, even if they do not inform you, and they are unable to complete the services.  When determining whether a victim/survivor is served, partially served, or not served, do not consider services the victim/survivor declined, unless the victim/survivor requested a service but found the program rules unacceptable.

27.  Reasons that victims/survivors seeking services were not served or were partially served

Indicate the reasons that victims/survivors seeking services were not served or were partially served by checking all that apply.  OVW acknowledges that funded programs may not be able to serve all victims/survivors who request services.  This information is being collected to identify unmet needs and barriers to service.

Conflict of interest:  The program cannot serve the victim/survivor because current or previous relationships with that victim/survivor or other parties related to that victim/survivor would interfere with the ability of the program to serve that victim/survivor.  For example, the program is currently serving a victim/survivor.  Her partner, identifying as your client’s victim, requests to join the same support group as the person you are already serving.

Did not meet statutory requirements:  Victim/survivor does not meet requirements of statute.  For example, a victim/survivor requests help with a divorce, but has not met statutory residency requirements to file for a divorce in the jurisdiction.

Hours of operation: Hours during which the program provides services are not compatible with the hours the victims/survivors is available to receive requested services.

Insufficient/lack of culturally appropriate services: Services currently provided under the grant are not culturally appropriate for the victim/survivor.

Insufficient/lack of language capacity (including sign language): Interpreter services not available or not available at the time the victim/survivor is seeking services.  Victims/survivors may be placed on a waiting list to receive interpreter services, but have not been served by the end of the current reporting period.

Insufficient/lack of services for victims/survivors who have disabilities:  Staff are not able, for any reason, to provide appropriate or adequate services for victims/survivors who have disabilities.   For example, the two wheelchair accessible rooms in your shelter are currently occupied by victims/survivors.

Lack of child care:  Victim/survivor is unable to receive requested services due to the lack of available child care.

Program reached capacity:  Program is operating at full capacity.  Victims/survivors may be placed on a waiting list.

Program rules not acceptable to victim/survivor:  Although eligible for services under the grant, a victim/survivor is not willing to comply with rules of the program.  For example, a program requires that victim/survivors who participate in counseling sessions only smoke outside the building where the sessions take place.  A victim/survivor says that she is unwilling to come to counseling unless she is allowed to smoke during the session.

Program unable to provide service due to limited resources/priority setting:  Program has set priorities (e.g., that they will only represent victims/survivors in protection order hearings who are in imminent danger, or who have complex legal issues related to their protection orders) and is unable to serve victims/survivors who do not meet the priority criteria because of limited resources.

Services inappropriate or inadequate for victims/survivors with mental health issues:  Staff are not able, for any reason, to provide appropriate or adequate services for victims/survivors with mental health issues.  For example, the program does not have overnight staff and the victim/survivor cannot be left alone overnight.

Services inappropriate or inadequate for victims/survivors with substance abuse issues:  Staff are not able, for any reason, to provide appropriate or adequate services for victims/survivors with substance abuse problems.

Services not appropriate for victims/survivors:  For any reason, the services available under the grant are not appropriate for a victim/survivor.  For example, although support groups are offered under the grant for survivors of sexual assault, a victim/survivor requesting support group services is not served because it is clinically determined that the victim/survivor is not appropriate for the group.

Services not available for victims/survivors accompanied by male adolescent:  Although shelter services are provided under the grant, your shelter has rules prohibiting adolescent males from residing in the shelter, and the victim/survivor refuses to go to the shelter without the child.  Therefore, the victim/survivor is denied shelter services.

Transportation:  Victim/survivor is unable to arrange for transportation to receive services or to attend court hearings.  This includes situations in which public transportation is not available or, if available, cannot be paid for.

Below are examples of responses in the “other” category that indicate the victim/survivor should have been reported in a different category or should not have been reported at all in answer to this question.

EXAMPLE 1:  In the “Other” category, you report “Victim refused services.”

If your program offers services, usually through outreach, and the victim/survivor refuses the services or does not contact your program to accept services, you would not count this person at all in this section.

EXAMPLE 2:  In the “Other” category, you report “Service was not provided by our program.”

Only consider services supported with grant funds.  For example, your Elder Grants Program grant funds only crisis intervention services, but a victim/survivor contacts your program seeking crisis intervention and a support group.  You only consider your program’s ability to provide the crisis intervention when determining if the victim/survivor should be counted as served, partially served, or not served, since your program is not funded to provide support group services.

EXAMPLE 3:  In the “Other” category, you report “Could not locate victim.”

If your program began to provide the requested services, this person would be counted as served.  However, if this person was placed on a waiting list, and when your program was able to provide the service you were not able to locate the victim/survivor, you would then count this victim/survivor as not served.  You would indicate “program reached capacity” in question 27 because your program was not able to provide the service when it was requested.

28. Demographics of victims/survivors served or partially served

Based on the victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B, report the total numbers for all that apply.  Because victims/survivors may identify as more than one race or ethnicity, and with more than one of the “other demographics” options, the totals for these two categories may exceed the total number of victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B.  However, the total number of victim/survivors reported under “Gender” and the total number reported under “Age” should equal the total number of victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B.  The demographic categories listed under race/ethnicity are mandated by the federal Office of Management and Budget.

Race/ethnicity: Report the race or ethnicity with which the victim/survivor identifies.  You may count victims/survivors in more than one of the race/ethnicity categories.

Gender: Report the gender of each victim/survivor, or if the gender is unknown, report it as unknown.  This is an unduplicated count, and the total number for gender should equal the sum of 26A and 26B.

Age: Report the number of victims/survivors served in the applicable age category, or if the age is unknown, report it as unknown.  This is an unduplicated count, and the total number for age should equal the sum of 26A and 26B.

People with disabilities: Count victims/survivors with a significant limitation in activities of daily living as people with disabilities.  This may include people who are blind or who have low vision, people with developmental disabilities, and people with mental health issues or who have a mental illness, or people with a chronic, debilitating illness.

People with limited English proficiency: Report the number of victims/survivors served who have limited English proficiency.  Individuals who do not speak English as their primary language and who have limited ability to read, write, speak, or understand English can be counted as having limited English proficiency.

People who are immigrants/refugees/asylum seekers: Where possible, report the number of victims/survivors who were immigrants/refugees/asylum seekers.  This is not a question about immigration or legal status.

People who live in rural areas: Report the number of victims/survivors who live in a rural area or community.  (If you do not know if an area is rural, you may use any of the following definitions: any area or community, respectively, no part of which is within an area designated as a standard metropolitan statistical area by the Office of Management and Budget, consistent with the U.S. Census; or any area or community, respectively, that is within an area designated as a metropolitan statistical area or considered as a part of a metropolitan statistical area and is located in a rural census tract.)

EXAMPLE:  You served an 82 year old woman who is a victim/survivor of sexual assault, who identifies as Alaska Native and Asian, who does not read or write English, and whose primary language is Korean.  Count this victim/survivor under Race/Ethnicity (Alaska Native and Asian), Gender (Female), Age (76-84), and as a person with limited English proficiency.

29. Victims/survivors’ relationship to offender

For those victims/survivors reported as served and partially served in items 26A and 26B, report the relationship of the victim/survivor to the offender by type of victimization.  Victims/survivors are those against whom the sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation was directed.  If a victim/survivor experienced more than one type of victimization and/or was victimized by more than one perpetrator, count the victim/survivor in all categories that apply.  The total number of relationships in the sexual assault column must be at least the sum of the number of sexual assault victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B; the total number in the domestic violence/dating violence column must be at least the sum of the number of domestic violence/dating violence victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B; the total number in the stalking column must be at least the sum of the number of stalking victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B; and the total number in the elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation column must be at least the sum of the number of elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B. The total number of victims/survivors reported here all together may total more than the sum of all victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B.

Current or former spouse or intimate partner:  The victim/survivor (1) is currently or formerly married to the offender, (2) shares a child in common with the offender, (3) is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the offender as a spouse, or (4) is a person similarly situated to a spouse of the offender under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies.

Parent/grandparent:  The victim/survivor is the parent or grandparent of the offender.

Other family member or household member:  The victim/survivor is related to the offender by blood, kinship, or similar relationships; shared a household with the offender; or have/had a roommate relationship with the offender. Note: Victims who are parents or grandparents of the offender should only be reported in the separate category of “Parent/grandparent.”

Dating relationship:  The victim/survivor is, or has been, in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the offender.  The existence of such a relationship is determined by the following factors: 1) length of the relationship; 2) type of relationship; and 3) frequency of the interaction between the persons involved.

Acquaintance:  The victim/survivor is known to the offender.  For example, the victim/survivor is a neighbor, employee, co-worker, friend, fellow schoolmate, student, etc., of the offender.

Stranger:  The victim/survivor and the offender are not known to each other.

Patient/client care receiver:  The victim/survivor is or was receiving personal care services from the offender.  This does not include victims/survivors who are receiving personal care service from family members, a spouse, or intimate partner, or from friends—those victim relationships would be reported in the appropriate categories above.

EXAMPLE: For a victim/survivor who was being stalked by her former intimate partner and was sexually assaulted by the person who is her personal care attendant, the victim relationships would be reported as follows:  In the “Current or former spouse or intimate partner” row, report one in the “Stalking” column; in the “Patient/client care receiver” row, report one in the “Sexual assault” column.

30A. Victim services

Based on the victims/survivors reported in 26A and 26B, report the number of primary victims/survivors who received Elder Grants Program-funded services during the current reporting  period. Count each victim/survivor only once for each type of service that victim/survivor received during the current reporting period; do not report the number of times that service was provided to the victim.

Civil legal advocacy/court accompaniment:  Assisting a victim/survivor with civil legal issues, including preparing paperwork for protection orders; accompanying a victim/survivor to a protection order hearing, or other civil proceeding; and all other advocacy within the civil justice system.  This also includes accompanying a victim/survivor to an administrative hearing, such as unemployment, Social Security, TANF, or food stamp hearing.

Civil legal assistance: Civil legal services provided by an attorney and/or paralegal.

Counseling /support group:  Individual or group counseling or support provided by a volunteer, peer, or professional.

Criminal justice advocacy/court accompaniment: Assisting a victim/survivor with criminal legal issues including notifying the victim/survivor of case status, hearing dates, plea agreements, and sentencing terms; preparing paperwork such as victim impact statements; accompanying a victim/survivor to a criminal court proceeding or law enforcement interview; and all other advocacy within the criminal justice system.

Crisis intervention:  Process by which a person identifies, assesses, and intervenes with an individual in crisis so as to restore balance and reduce the effects of the crisis in her/his life.  In this category, report crisis intervention that occurs in person and/or over the telephone.

Financial counseling: Actions designed to assist those who are having difficulty managing their finances to ensure the proper use of their income/resources and prevent mismanagement and financial exploitation by others.

Forensic exam: A medical examination to collect and document evidence, evaluate and treat STDs and pregnancy, and refer victims/survivors to follow-up or medical care or counseling. Does not include accompanying the victim/survivor to a hospital, clinic, or medical office.

Hospital/clinic/other medical response:  Accompanying a victim/survivor to, or meeting a victim/survivor at, a hospital, clinic, or medical office.

Language services: Translation, interpretation, and other services provided to ensure effective communication with victims/survivors with disabilities and to assist those victims/survivors to participate in or access services.

Transportation:  Provision of transportation, either directly or through bus passes, taxi fares, or other means of transportation.

Victim/survivor advocacy:  Actions designed to help the victim/survivor obtain needed resources or services including employment, housing, shelter services, health care, victim’s compensation, etc.

30B. Shelter Services

Report the total number of victims/survivors and accompanying family members who received emergency shelter or transitional housing.  This should be an unduplicated count of both victims/survivors and family members.  This means that each victim/survivor and each family member who received shelter services during the current reporting period should be counted only once.  Report the total number of bed nights provided in emergency shelter or transitional housing to victims/survivors and family members.  The number of bed nights is computed by multiplying the number of victims and family members by the number of nights they stayed in the shelter.  The number of bed nights will typically be significantly higher than the number of victims and family members.

EXAMPLE: If 10 victims/survivors stayed in the emergency shelter for 5 days each and each victim survivor was accompanied by 3 family members who also stayed for 5 nights each, this would be reported as follows: In the “Emergency shelter” row, report 10 in the “Number of victims/survivors” column, 30 in the “Number of family members” column, and 200 in the “Number of bed nights” column. END EXAMPLE.

Emergency shelter: Victim/survivor is housed in a safe, sometimes confidential place that provides 24-hour access to living quarters for a limited amount of time.  Emergency shelter can also be safe-homes (generally private homes allowing a victim/survivor who is in immediate danger to stay for a short period of time on an emergency basis) and hotel accommodations.

Transitional housing: Victim/survivor is housed either in an apartment or single-family unit.  This housing often includes a case management component that would include a work plan for what the client will accomplish while staying at the facility.  Victims/survivors and their children are offered an  array of direct services that the victim service agency offers other clients, such as court advocacy and assistance in getting TANF, WIC, job training, child care, legal assistance, permanent housing, vouchers, support and educational groups, and other services.

30C. Hotline calls

Report the number of crisis or information and referral calls received on phone lines paid for with Elder Grants Program funds or answered by Elder Grant Program-funded staff during the current reporting period.  Calls reported here should not be reported as victims/survivors served in question 26 unless they also received at least one of the services listed in question 30A Victim Services or question 30B Shelter Services.  All calls, whether or not from victims/survivors, should be included in Total number of calls.

EXAMPLE 1: A victim/survivor calls the grant-funded hotline and is in crisis. The advocate spends 30 minutes on the call assisting the victim/survivor. In this case, the call would be counted in this question under “Number of calls from primary victims” and under “Total number of calls.”  The victim/survivor would also be counted in question 26 as a victim served, in question 30A under “Crisis intervention,” and demographics would need to be collected on this caller in questions 28 and 29.

EXAMPLE 2:  A mother of a victim/survivor calls the grant-funded hotline and requests  information about available services for her daughter.  Your program provides her with the information.  In this case, she would be counted in this question under “Total number of calls”- she would not be reported in any other questions, and demographics would not be collected for this caller.

30D. Victim-witness notification/outreach to victims/survivors

Report the number of unsolicited letters, phone calls, or visits to victims/survivors of specific incidents of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking identified in police reports or court documents, informing them of services and/or providing information about the criminal justice system. Victims/survivors who are the recipients of these notification/outreach activities should not be reported as victims/survivors served in question 26 unless they also received at least one of the services reported in question 30A Victims Services or question 30B Shelter Services.

EXAMPLE 1: Your agency works closely with local law enforcement and they provide you with copies of the police reports. Your agency sends out 75 letters during the current reporting period and five victims/survivors call and request grant-funded services. In this case, you would report 75 in question 30D and the 5 victims/survivors requesting grant-funded services would also be counted in question 30A by the type of grant-funded service they requested. These 5 victims/survivors would be reported in question 26 and, if they were reported as served or partially served, demographics would also need to be reported in questions 28 and29.  However, if no victims/survivors requested services, you would only report in question 30D.

EXAMPLE 2: Your agency conducts outreach activities in the community during the current reporting period.  Your grant-funded outreach worker conducts outreach by visiting the homes of 10 victims/survivors during the current reporting period. Each victim/survivor refuses services.  In this case, you would only report those 10 outreach activities in question 30D.  The victims/survivors visited by the outreach worker would not be reported at all in question 26 and no other demographics would need to be reported.

31. Protection orders

Report the total number of temporary and/or final protection orders requested and granted for which Elder Grants Program-funded victim services staff assisted victims/survivors during the current reporting period.  This should include all orders having the force of law that are designed to protect the victim/survivor from contact with the offender during the pendency of the order.  They may be referred to as protection from abuse, protection from harassment or anti-harassment orders, restraining orders, or no-contact or stay-away orders in your jurisdiction, and they may be criminal or civil.  Temporary orders are generally issued ex parte, meaning without a court hearing, for a short period of time (e.g., 30 days), and final orders are issued after a court hearing for a longer period of time (e.g., two years).  For all instances in which victim services staff assisted the victim/survivor in obtaining such an order, the number of those orders requested and granted, and whether they were for victims/survivors of domestic violence/ dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking,  should be reported here.

32. (Optional) Additional Information

Use the space provided to discuss the effectiveness of victim services activities funded or supported by your Elder Grants Program.  You may provide examples, data, or any other information about your victim services activities that you have not already provided.

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E. Narrative

All grantees must answer question 33.

Please limit your responses to the space provided.

33. Report on the status of the goals and objectives for this grant.

Report on your Elder Grants Program as of the end of the current reporting period, as identified in your grant proposal or as they have been added or revised.  Indicate whether the activities related to your objectives for the current reporting period have been completed, are in progress, are delayed or have been revised.  Comment on your successes and challenges, and provide any additional explanation you feel is necessary for us to understand what you have or have not accomplished relative to your goals and objectives.  If you have not accomplished objectives that should have been accomplished during the current reporting period, you must provide an explanation.

EXAMPLE:

Objective: Train all victim services agencies on responding to sexual assault victims/survivors who are older

Activity: Develop training curricula and conduct five regional trainings.

Status: Ongoing.

Comments: Although we developed training curricula and conducted five regional trainings, only half of the victim services agency staff were trained.  We will conduct five more regional trainings during the next six months in an attempt to train all victim services staff. END EXAMPLE.

All grantees must answer questions 34 and 35 on an annual basis. 

Submit these answers on the January to June reporting form only. Please limit your responses to the space provided.

34. What do you see as the most significant areas of remaining need, with regard to obstacles faced by individuals who are older?

Consider the following issues: responsiveness of the criminal justice system at the local, state and federal levels to individuals who are older; cross-training of elder advocates and sexual and domestic violence advocates; community, regional or state-based issues; particular racial, ethnic, cultural or social issues that need to be addressed in training.

35. What has Elder Grants Program funding allowed you to do that you could not do prior to receiving this funding?

Report on activities you are able to engage in, collaborations you have been able to build, or work that you have been able to continue, because of the Elder Grants Program. For example, expand training to new law enforcement jurisdictions; purchase TTY’s for all prosecutors in your jurisdiction

Questions 36 and 37 are optional.

Please limit your responses to the space provided.

36. Provide any additional information that you would like us to know about your Elder Grants Program and/or the effectiveness of your grant

If you have other data or information regarding your program that would more fully or accurately reflect the effectiveness of your Elder Grants Program than the data you have been asked to provide on this form, answer this question.  If you have not already done so elsewhere on this form, you may want to report on systems-level changes, institutionalization of training curricula, the removal or reduction of barriers and challenges for victims/survivors who are older, use of volunteers and/or interns to complete activities, promising practices, and positive or negative unintended consequences.

37. Provide any additional information that you would like us to know about the data submitted.

If you have any information that could be helpful in understanding the data you have submitted in this report, please answer this question.  For example, if you submitted two different progress reports for the same reporting period, you may explain how the data was apportioned to each report; or if you funded staff—e.g., trainer, victim advocates, etc.—but did not report any corresponding training or victim services activities, you may explain why; or if you did not use program funds to support either staff or activities during the reporting period, please explain how program funds were used, if you have not already done so.

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